The RISE is different from many other reading assessments in that it tests various component skills that underlie reading and provides a detailed picture of the struggling reader.

 

There is a focus on each of the following components:

Word Recognition

and Decoding

Vocabulary

Morphology

Sentence

Processing

Efficiency

Reading

Comprehension

The ability to "get words off the page" accurately and efficiently. Sight word recognition is essential to fluent reading, while decoding is a skill that all readers use when they encounter novel words ("glutamate" and "uxorious"), proper names ("Bolivia" and "Myanmar") and product names ("Jenuvia" and "Kleenex").

The ability to understand the meaning of individual words and their relationships to topical knowledge.

 

 

The ability to understand that many words – especially academic words – are made up of several meaningful parts, as in civilization: civil + ize + ation, and to use those parts to aid in word recognition, sentence comprehension, and learning the meaning of new words.

The ability to comprehend sentences of varying levels of syntactic complexity, from very easy short sentences ("The book is on the table.") to more difficult sentences that use complex syntactic structures and are often found in textbooks and other kinds of academic writing. ("The first ten amendments to the United States Constitution, also known as the Bill of Rights, are a series of statements that protect individual rights, though their exact meaning has been the object of much interpretation.")

The ability to read text accurately and at an appropriate rate for comprehension. As adolescents move through school, the amount of reading they are expected to complete increases as does the variety of genres (textbooks, primary documents, biographies, plays, novels, etc.) they will encounter; rapid, accurate reading is important to comprehending and learning from longer, varied texts and hence to long-term academic success.

The ability to read text accurately and at an appropriate rate for comprehension. As adolescents move through school, the amount of reading they are expected to complete increases as does the variety of genres (textbooks, primary documents, biographies, plays, novels, etc.) they will encounter; rapid, accurate reading is important to comprehending and learning from longer, varied texts and hence to long-term academic success.

For all inquiries about the use of the RISE test, including accounts and payment options, please e-mail RISE_Info@ets.org.

The RISE was developed through a SERP collaboration with Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the Boston Public Schools.

Strategic Education Research Partnership  •  1100 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 1310  •  Washington, DC  20036

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